Girl Power!

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It’s Girl Power Month!! Otherwise known as Women’s History month. And it’s time to bring out all those fantastic books about GIRL POWER! I’ve got some great lists of books to use in the classroom plus some really fun facts about women in history. Come on teachers – let’s celebrate women’s history!

Fun Facts
One of the greatest spies in World War II was a woman. Nancy Wake was known as The White Mouse and was one of the Gestapo’s most wanted spies with a 5 million-franc price on her head.

A woman was the ruler of one of the largest empress in the history of the world.  At one Queen Victoria’s empire included land on nearly every continent.  She ruled from Britain to India, Australia to Canada, South Africa to Egypt, and even controlled Hong Kong.  It was said that the sun never set on the British Empire.

The world’s first Novel was written by a woman. The Tale of Genji was published in Japan around 1000CE.  It was written by Murasaki Shikibu and was a story about life in royal Japanese court.

Nan’yehi was woman warrior for the Cherokee Nation.  When her husband was killed during battle in 1775, she took his place and led the Cherokee to victory.

Some Great Books!!!
Look Up!: Henrietta Leavitt, Pioneering Woman Astronomer by Robert Burleigh
Henrietta Swan Leavitt was born on July 4, 1868, and she changed the course of astronomyherietta when she was just twenty-five years old. Henrietta spent years measuring star positions and sizes from photographs taken by the telescope at the Harvard College Observatory, where she worked. After Henrietta observed that certain stars had a fixed pattern to their changes, her discovery made it possible for astronomers to measure greater and greater distances—leading to our present understanding of the vast size of the universe.

Solving the Puzzle Under the Sea By Robert Burleigh
Marie Tharp was always fascinated by the ocean. Taught to think big by her father who wassolving-the-puzzle-e1457211817862 a mapmaker, Marie wanted to do something no one had ever done before: map the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean. Was it even possible? Not sure if she would succeed, Marie decided to give it a try.

Check out these book lists!
Disrupters, Daredevils, and Artists: Women Who Changed the World

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21+ Children’s Books about Women Scientists

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Kirkus list of great books for Women’s History Month

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Boys and Books – Get them Hooked!

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Once upon a time I had dreams…

I dreamed that I would have children who loved to read as much as I did.  That we would be a literary family comparing the books we adored and arguing over Tolkien versus Lewis.

Then I met my son –

josh

Reading is not his idea of a good time.

And apparently my son is not the only boy who would rather eat fire than read books.

As a teacher and a writer I had a new dream.  I was going to teach boys to like books.

Epic FAIL. Again.

No matter how much you bribe some boys, they will not enjoy Amber Brown, Junie B. Jones, or The Magic Treehouse.  And I used some great bribes, like – if you read this book, I’ll help you build an exploding rocket.  Or if you read this book – I’ll take you rock hunting.  Instead they wanted to read about how to build the rocket or how to find fossils.

Oh wait – they wanted to READ about how to do things!  They wanted to learn facts and decipher instructions. Finally!! I got it. And I started giving them what they wanted.  NONFICTION!!!

Over the years I have learned that all I really have to do is learn what interests a reluctant reader. (And this applies to girls, too.) Do they like cars? Airplanes? Mummies? Sharks? Outer space? Disgusting body functions?  There’s a book about that!

Nonfiction is the way to a boys (and girls) heart.  And my latest book series is designed just for them.  The Top Secret Files of History explores the truth behind dangerous spies like The White Mouse Mata Hari. Readers can discover real life pirates of the Caribbean and learn about the true Lone Ranger.

The stories are all short.  Many of them no longer than 500 words.  The books also have multiple entry points.  They are not in sequential order so readers can pick up the books and read in the middle or at the end and still get great information.

1618214616_b 9781618214621

The two newest books, Wild West and Gangsters and Bootleggers will be in bookstores December 1.  I hope you will check them out for your own favorite reluctant reader!

Bubble Homes and Fish Farts Informational Text Lesson Grades 3-4

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20668317Fish Farts.  Just the title alone will have your students begging to read this book. And you will be happy to oblige because this book is a great example of how to capture the imagination and teach information at the same time.

Author Fiona Bayrock writes with lively language to explain how fish use bubbles or F.aR.T.s to communicate.  She also gives fascinating information on how animals use bubbles to keep warm, to build homes, and for defense.  It makes for a great read aloud/discussion book and can also be used with a science unit on bubbles or animals.  Grab this book from your library and try out the lesson plan below.  I have coordinated it with common core state standards for grades 3-4.

Time Required: Three to five 40 minute class periods

Day 1 

Materials:

  • Bubble Homes and Fish Farts
  • Whiteboard or Chart paper
  • Markers
  • Access to computer
  • Pencil and paper
  1. Ask the children if they have ever considered whether or not fish fart? (This will elicit giggles and comments, but it will also grab the students’ attention) Tell them that scientists study all sorts of strange and interesting topics including fish farts.  Today they will be learning some scientific facts about animals by reading the informational text, Bubble Homes and Fish Farts by Fiona Bayrock.
  1. Ask the students to use pencil and paper to write down (take notes on) scientific facts that they learn while you read the book.
  1. Read the book – pausing for questions and discussion after each animal.
  1. After you have read the book, lead the children in discussing the different facts they learned. Ask them to use their notes to help them remember the ways animals used bubbles.  Make a class list on the whiteboard.
  1. Discuss how the author learned all this information. Turn to the back of the book and show the students the author’s information about her research.
  1. Ask the students if this book gives them ideas for information they would like to research. What animals in the book would they like to learn more about?  Would they like to learn about other ways animals trap their food or build homes?  Make a list of research topics.
  1. Divide the class into research teams of two or three “research scientists.” Tell them that this week they will be using books and computers to answer science questions.  List a few science questions for the students to research. Have each team pick one question to research and write about.

Suggested Research Questions:

  • Are there other strange ways animals hunt?
  • How do other animals build homes?
  • What are some unique ways animals defend themselves?
  • I want to learn more about …


Day 2Sea_otters_holding_hands

Materials 

  • Books from the library on animals
  • Access to computers for children to look at specific websites suggested below

1. Hold up the Book Bubble Homes and Fish Farts and ask the students to review what they read yesterday. Remind them they will be conducting research today to find the answers to their animal questions.

2. Discuss how to read for information and how to take notes on facts.

  1. Help students select books and find designated websites.

(I have visited the websites below and when I viewed them there were no offensive ads or language, but you always want to check them out for yourself.  Everything on the internet is subject to change!)

Suggested Websites:

African Grey Tree Frog                       Amazing Animal Architects

Sea Otters                                          Weird Animal Hunters

Fascinating Animal Feeding                Animal Defenses

  1. During the last ten minutes of the class period have the teams of scientists meet together to discuss their findings. Give each group the opportunity to tell their most interesting fact.  Then tell the students that they will be writing their own report and making the illustrations in the next class periods.  Make sure they save their research!

Day 3-5greyfrog

Materials

  • Research materials/books
  • Access to computers
  • Pencil
  • Paper
  • Colored pencils
  1. Have the students get out their research from the previous lesson. Instruct them to work with their partners to write an informational text on their animal topic. Explain that they need to follow conventional grammar rules.  They will also be expected to provide a diagram that helps to explain their topic. (It may be a picture with labels.)
  1. Allow the students time to write and correct their papers. This may take two sessions depending on the abilities of the class.
  1. When students have completed their project provide time for them to present their findings to the other student scientists.

This lesson meets the CCSS standards:

Grade 3

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.3.2
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.3.2.B
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.4.1
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI. 4.2
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.4.3

Science, Math, and ELA in one lesson!

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Have I got a book for you!

Lifetime cover final_0I found the picture book that is the trifecta! It covers language
arts, math, and science plus it provides a great launch point for a fun research project.  I’m talking about – Lifetime – the Amazing Numbers in Animal Lives by Lola M. Schaefer.

In this book children learn about math in the animal world.  For example a mother red Kangaroo will birth 50 joeys in one lifetime, a caribou will grow and shed 10 sets of antlers, and a cross spider only lays one egg during its whole life.  The author includes wonderful back matter that gives more detail about the animals including how she calculated the numbers in the book.

Grab this book from the library and try out my lesson idea for a study that hits right in the heart of common core and narrative nonfiction. It is perfect for first and second grade students

Objective: Students will understand that numbers and math are a part of everyday life and research.

Time Required: One 40 minute class period

Materials:

Book  Lifetime – the Amazing Numbers in Animal Lives by Lola M. Schaefer

White board and markers, graph paper

  1. Hold up the book and read the title to the children. Lifetime – the Amazing Numbers in Animal Lives.  Ask how could numbers be important to animals?  What do they think this book will be about?  Is it going to be a fiction or a nonfiction book?
  1. Read the book aloud to your whole class and then engage them in a discussion about the text. How did the author find out about these numbers?  Did the author need to do research?  What math skills did the author use?
  1. Divide class into small groups of three to four students. Give each group graph paper and markers.
  1. Demonstrate on the board how to graph numbers.
  1. Have the students work together to make a graph of the animal numbers used in the book. You can stop them before they have to graph 1000 baby seahorses, but do discuss how you might be able to show that number.

Extension – check out animal books from the library and have the students research different numbers such as the number of teeth, eggs, or young.  Turn this research into informational graphs to be displayed in the classroom and write a paragraph to explain their research.

This lesson will cover the following Common Core Standards

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.2.4                                               CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.2.6

CCSS.Math.Content.2MD.D.9                     CCSS.ELA-literacy. W.2.2

Common Core Nonfiction – thematic lesson Animals

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Teaching nonfiction at the early elementary level is as easy as lions, tigers, and bears, oh yes! There’s nothing that intrigues young children like some amazing animal books. With an animal unit you will be able to incorporate a multitude of subjects such as science, geography, and writing while meeting the nonfiction requirements of common core. It’s a win for everyone.

Two great books to use for starting an animal unit are Abayomi by Darcy Pattison and Elizabeth Queen of the Seas by Lynne Cox. Both books address animals who are living in a populated area and how people interact with the wild animals.

Elizabeth Queen of the Seas – Lynne Coxelizabeth queen of seas
Elizabeth is an elephant seal who loved sunning herself on the warm banks of the Avon River in Christ Church, New Zealand. Unfortunately Elizabeth’s favorite spot was right in the middle of a busy street in town. The good people of Christ’s Church tried to help Elizabeth by hauling her out to sea where they felt she would be safer, but Elizabeth had other ideas and just kept coming back. After three unsuccessful attempts to move Elizabeth the townspeople decided to make her welcome by putting up road signs and protecting their special visitor. Elizabeth enjoyed a peaceful life with the help of her human protectors.

AbayomiCover300x200 (2)Abayomi – by Darcy Pattison
Abayomi’s mother is a Brazilian puma who has lost her habitat and now lives very close to a town. She survives by finding whatever food she can, including local chickens. When she is caught and killed Abayomi has to try to fend for himself. He struggles but is saved by local scientists. This book tells a different story about what sometimes happens to animals who live too close to people.

 

After reading the books to your class try these classroom activities:
1. Search for facts – Lead a class discussion to list the facts of each story. Remind students of the definition of a fact: Something known to exist or to have happened. List the facts on a board or paper where the class can read them.
2. Compare and Contrast – Have students work as a group to list ways the books are alike and how they are different.
3. Extended learning – lead students in researching websites that tell about elephant seals and Brazilian Pumas.
Puma
http://www.biokids.umich.edu/critters/Puma_concolor/
http://a-z-animals.com/animals/puma/
http://kidscorner.org/html/zoo0506.php
http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/wild/big-cat-week/articles/puma-facts/

Elephant Seal
http://www.theanimalfiles.com/mammals/seals_sea_lions/southern_elephant_seal.html
http://www.nwf.org/Kids/Ranger-Rick/Animals/Mammals/Elephant-Seals.aspx
http://www.antarctica.gov.au/about-antarctica/wildlife/animals/seals-and-sea-lions/elephant-seals
http://www.doc.govt.nz/conservation/native-animals/marine-mammals/seals/elephant-seal/

Common Core – teaching Nonfiction

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common coreThe debate goes on. Fans of common core promise it will bring education nirvana. Opponents predict it will propel us back into the dark ages. I suspect the truth is somewhere in the middle.

But while states and legislators argue the merits of national standards teachers are trying to figure out what they are supposed to do. I think there are some components of the program that make a great deal of sense and can be implemented whether or not your state joins the Common Core program.

One goal of the common core is to increase the use of nonfiction in the classroom, especially at the elementary level. Another is to increase the use of fact and research based writing. These two goals go hand-in-hand and I think they are practical objectives. The bulk of reading that is necessary for success in the work place is nonfiction reading. I believe we should introduce children to fact based learning as soon as possible.

I love a good novel as much as anyone. I am a voracious reader and I devour fiction books like they were dark chocolate. But as much as I love fiction I realize that reading and understanding nonfiction is an essential work-life skill. Carpenters must know how to read plans and instructions. Software developers, scientists, bankers and teachers all need to know how to read an interpret research and new articles. Truck drivers, postal workers, cooks and servers, all have to be able to read instructions, and interpret directions correctly. Reading, interpreting and understanding nonfiction is critical to all forms of work and for the ongoing progress of our nation.

Teaching students how to use and interpret nonfiction text is a part of the common core that makes sense to me for very practical reasons. In the next few weeks I hope to provide you with reviews for some of the great children’s nonfiction that is available and ideas on how to use it in your classroom. And hopefully when you see the amazing books that are available for your students you will see just how fun teaching nonfiction can be!